Vaccination and Deworming Schedule

 Idaho Equine Hospital 2012 Recommended Vaccination Schedule

 
 
Adult Horses
Traveling & Show Horses
 
Broodmares
Foals From Vaccinated Mares
Foals From Unvaccinated Mares
Eastern/ Western Encephalitis
 
Annually
 
Annually
Annually & 1 month prior to foaling
6, 7 & 8 months
3,4, & 5 months
 
Tetanus
 
Annually
 
Annually
Annually & 1 month prior to foaling
6, 7 & 8 months
3,4, & 5 months
 
Influenza*
 
Every 6 months
 
Every 6 months
Every 6 months &
1 month prior to foaling
6, 7 & 8 months
3,4, & 5 months
 
Rhinopneumonitis*
 
Every 6 months
 
Every 6 months
Every 6 months & 1 month prior to foaling
6, 7 & 8 months
3,4, & 5 months
 
West Nile Virus*
Spring
Spring
1 month prior to foaling
 
4 & 5 months
 
3 & 4 months
Pneumabort K or equal (always use a killed vaccine)
 
 
5, 7 & 9 months of pregnancy
 
 
Rabies
Currently recommended by AAEP-please discuss with your veterinarian.
Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA)
 
 
Available
 
 
 
 
 

**Additional vaccines for strangles, rabies, and Potomac Horse Fever are available for use in certain situations.  Please discuss which is appropriate for you with your veterinarian.


 Deworming Protocols:

ROTATIONAL DEWORMING PROTOCOL FOR FOALS
Product
Foals
Ivermectin
2 & 6 months
Strongid (pyrantel)
4 months
Panacur (fenbendazole)
8 months (single dose)
 
DEWORMING PROGRAMS FOR ADULT HORSES
For years the primary management tool for controlling internal parasites has consisted of rotational deworming of all horses on the farm every 8 to 16 weeks.  This approach has led to some anthelmitic resistance to several of the drugs that we have available. This is particularly concerning because there are no new drugs coming on to the market in the near future.
A more sound approach is for the horse owner and veterinarian to work together to design a specific parasite control program individualized to your farm.  This approach will limit anthelmitic resistance while saving you money on purchasing dewormers.  Factors such as housing, horse density, age, season, parasite load, and drug resistance will be addressed.  The use of fecal egg counts from a simple fecal sample will help to identify high risk horses as well as the general parasite contamination on your premise.

Please call to schedule a herd health consultation where we can begin developing a parasite control program as well as discuss vaccination schedules, nutrition, and dental care that will benefit both you and your horses.  We also recommend that all horses undergo a physical exam at least once a year. 

24 Hour Emergency Sevice (208)466-4613